The Design and Technology faculty at St Andrew’s is a forward-thinking department that is focused on providing learning experiences that build essential skills for modern life. The department incorporates design, craft, and graphic skills, so it is a diverse and interesting place to learn.

We cover subjects that are focused on the creation of items that solve problems, like:

  • 3D designed products
  • 2D/3D designed graphics
  • Crafted products in Wood , Metal and plastics
  • Designed & Manufactured products 

The faculty offers a wide range of subjects, with pupils getting a wide range of experiences in S1 and S2 that prepare them for more specialised work, firstly at the end of the BGE phase in S3 then into certificated subjects in S4/5/6:

  • S1/2/3 Design and Technology BGE (Graphic Communication, Design & Manufacture, Practical Craft)
  • Design and Manufacture (National 4 & 5 and Higher)
  • Graphic Communication (National 4 & 5 and Higher)
  • Practical Woodworking (National 4 & 5)
  • Practical Metalworking  (National 4 & 5)

To do this we utilise a huge range of technologies as tools, ranging from the most basic hand tools to high level Computer Graphic. Our focus is building the skills of our pupils in the use of these ‘tools’ to solve problems in the best way possible and to build on skills that will enable young people to enter the word of work with confidence and a wide range of abilities..

Our teachers have a vast range of experience which they draw upon when working with pupils. We have experience from product design, mechanical, electrical and electronic engineering, graphics, architecture, industries, as well as a huge amount of experience in learning and education.

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First to Third Year: Broad General Education

Course Content

In S1, S2 and S3, our pupils will be taught and practice a variety of skills relating to Design and Technology Education.  Pupils will manufacture solutions to everyday problems through a series of relevant and interesting projects.  The pupils will be taught how to follow the ‘Design Process’ to produce personalised artefacts.  They will also learn skills and knowledge relating to working with wood, metal and plastics. The Technical department also combines Graphic Communication skills with computer Autodesk Inventor software, 3D Computer Modelling and Desktop Publishing.

Context for Learning

Curriculum for Excellence in the Design and Technology faculty focuses on several key areas of learning:  basic engineering principles, designing, product evaluation, materials, manufacturing, manual Graphic/Technical Drawing and computer aided design/manufacture.

The aims of the Course are to enable learners to:

  • Develop skills in producing and interpreting sketches, drawings and diagrams 
  • Develop skills in practical model making and construction 
  • Develop skills in testing and evaluation of materials /products /models 
  • Apply safe working practices in a workshop or similar environment
  • Develop knowledge of materials, tools, machinery, processes and engineering terms.

Methodologies

Co-operative learning within our projects provide opportunities for pupils to identify strengths in themselves and others.    Through teamwork, pupils will work towards a common goal while learning vital social skills and taking an active role.

AiFL techniques help pupils to become successful learners.  This is done by allowing pupils the chance to identify the best way for them to learn.  Pupils also play a part in deciding on how to identify what they are good at and how to improve   ‘weaknesses’ in the future.

Practical work remains integral to the Design and Technology faculty department.  As such, we have two workshops which allow pupils to use tools, power tools and machines to manufacture products.  Active tasks are widely enjoyed by all our pupils and also provide a degree of exercise at times!

The Design and Teachnology faculty uses several ICT resources in the delivery and content of our courses.  We use CAD software, Printers, Scanners and digital cameras etc. and as such are one of the key subjects in driving forward practical application of ICT.

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N5 Graphic Communication

Purpose and aims of the Course

The Course provides opportunity for learners to gain skills in reading, interpreting, and creating graphic communications. Learners will initiate, develop and communicate ideas graphically. They will develop spatial awareness and visual literacy through graphic experiences. 

The Course is practical, exploratory and experiential in nature. It combines elements of recognised professional standards for graphic communication partnered with graphic design creativity and visual impact. 

The Course allows learners to engage with technologies. It allows learners to consider the impact that graphic communication technologies have on our environment and society. 

The aims of the Course are to enable learners to: 

  • Develop skills in graphic communication techniques, including the use of equipment, graphics materials and software 
  • Extend and apply knowledge and understanding of graphic communication standards, protocols, and conventions where these apply 
  • Develop an understanding of the impact of graphic communication technologies on our environment and society 

Approaches to Learning and Teaching 

The emphasis throughout the course is on pupil centred learning. We try, as a department to use many and varied strategies to enhance pupil learning including various innovative group centred challenges where pupils learn transferable thinking skills which are then applied across the course. Allied to this is the use of modern industry standard software to build 3D models which allow pupils to both construct and visualise various components. Class demonstrations are regularly carried out with live video linking to a large screen, a system which allows hard copies of various techniques to be saved and distributed as learning aids, in addition to the inherent classroom management benefits of this technique. At all stages pupils views are sought and acted upon in relation to the effectiveness of teaching and learning as the department continually strives to become a leader in the field of Design & Technology education. 

Homework 

Homework will be set regularly, reinforcing the theoretical content of the course, and is essential to the success of the pupil. In addition to this, each pupil will be expected to allocate extra time to the graphic design aspects of the course.

N5 Design and Manufacture

Aims of the Course 

The aims of the Course are to enable learners to develop:

  • Skills in the design and manufacturing of models, prototypes and products.
  • Knowledge and understanding of manufacturing processes and materials.
  • An understanding of the impact of design and manufacturing technologies on our environment and society

Assessment

The Course consists of three main aspects; Design, Practical and an Exam.  Pupils will create a design portfolio based around a given design brief, they will then Manufacture a one off model of their design for the practical element. These two sections are worth roughly 55% of their overall mark so success in this is extremely important. Finally they have the exam, this will test their knowledge and understanding of basic workshop processes, testing knowledge of tools and correct working practice. It will also test knowledge of materials, manufacturing processes, environmental impact and commercial manufacture.

Design

Over the course of the year students will complete a series of Design Tasks that will help prepare pupils for the assignment folio at the end of the year.

Practical

Pupils will complete a series of basic woodwork joints, a Small Box and our Desk Architecture project. These projects are designed to help students understand a broad range of workshop processes along with giving them the experience they need to complete the practical aspect of the assignment.

Materials & Manufacture

Pupils will learn about the different materials out there alongside the manufacturing processes used in industry. They will learn about materials and manufacture to prepare them for the exam.
 

Higher Graphic Communication

The Course provides opportunities for learners to initiate and develop their own ideas graphically. It allows them to develop skills in reading and interpreting graphics produced by others. Learners will continue to develop graphic awareness in often complex graphic situations thus expanding their visual literacy. 

The Course is practical, exploratory and experiential in nature. It combines elements of creativity and communicating for visual impact with elements of protocol and an appreciation of the importance of graphic communication standards, where these are appropriate. 

The Course allows learners to engage with technologies. It allows learners to consider the impact that graphic communication technologies have on our environment and society. 

The aims of the Course are to enable learners to develop: 

  • skills in graphic communication techniques, including the use of equipment, graphics materials and software 
  • creativity in the production of graphic communications to produce visual impact in meeting a specified purpose 
  • skills in evaluating the effectiveness of graphics in communicating and meeting their purpose 
  • an understanding of graphic communication standards protocols and conventions, where these apply 
  • an understanding of the impact of graphic communication technologies on our environment and society 

Approaches to Learning and Teaching 

The emphasis throughout the course is on pupil centred learning. We try, as a department to use many and varied strategies to enhance pupil learning including various innovative group centred challenges where pupils learn transferable thinking skills which are then applied across the course. Allied to this is the use of modern industry standard software to build 3D models which allow pupils to both construct and visualise various components. Class demonstrations are regularly carried out with live video linking to a large screen, a system which allows hard copies of various techniques to be saved and distributed as learning aids, in addition to the inherent classroom management benefits of this technique. At all stages pupils views are sought and acted upon in relation to the effectiveness of teaching and learning as the department continually strives to become a leader in the field of Design & Technology education. 

Homework

Homework will be set regularly, reinforcing the theoretical content of the course, and is essential to the success of the pupil. 
 

Higher Design & Manufacture 

Purpose and aims of the Course 

The Course provides a broad and practical experience in product design and manufacture. It provides opportunities for learners to gain skills in designing and communicating design proposals and opportunities for learners to refine and resolve their design ideas effectively. 

The Course stresses the integration of designing and making. It confirms that design is an iterative process. The Course highlights the close relationship between designing, making, testing, and refining design ideas. 

The Course provides opportunities for learners to apply practical skills and an understanding of the properties and uses of materials and manufacturing processes. It does so in a way that allows learners to inform and refine their own design proposals. It offers them opportunities to explore design alternatives and to consider the manufacturing practicalities that these design alternatives bring to light. 

The Course combines elements of creativity and designing for aesthetic or visual impact with elements of designing for the practicalities of manufacturing. It helps the learner appreciate the importance to a product of form, function, and performance. It helps them develop strategies for the evaluation of these attributes and to refine and resolve their designs accordingly. 

The Course allows learners to consider the various factors that impact on a product’s design. It will consider the life cycle of a product from its inception through design, manufacture, and use, including its disposal and/or re-use — cradle-to-cradle. 

The Course provides learners with opportunities to develop: 

  • research skills 
  • idea generation techniques 
  • the ability to read drawings and diagrams 
  • the ability to communicate design ideas and practical details 
  • the ability to evaluate and apply both tangible and subjective feedback 
  • the ability to devise, plan and develop practical solutions to design opportunities 

The Course allows learners to engage with technologies. It allows them to evaluate both the impact that design and manufacturing technologies have on our environment and society and how technologies have impacted on the world of the designer and on the manufacturing industry. 

The Higher Design and Manufacture Course differ in purpose and aim from the equivalent Courses at National 4 and National 5. It does so most obviously by requiring learners to give greater priority to evaluating design proposals and arriving at a resolved design. Of necessity, this may reduce time spent on crafting quality prototypes. Subsequently it is likely to increase the time spent on making practical models in order to inform and refine design proposals. 

The aims of the Course are to enable learners to develop: 

  • skills in design and in refining design proposals 
  • practical skills in the planning and development of models and prototypes skills in evaluation and research knowledge and understanding of manufacturing processes and materials 
  • an understanding of the impact of design and manufacturing technologies on our environment and society 

Approaches to Learning and Teaching 

The emphasis is on pupil centred learning where pupils work individually, and in teams, on set assignments and case studies, analysing products, producing design solutions, modelling and evaluating them. The department provides a stimulating and dynamic learning environment where students are able to explore a variety of learning styles. The department enthusiastically harnesses the potential of multimedia technology to present teaching material in a way that deepens understanding of the subject and this in turn motivates and engages the students. Students are encouraged to experiment with materials and their creativity is liberated by the freedom they’re given to assemble their concepts in 3 dimensions at the earliest possible opportunity. 

Homework 

Homework will be set on a regular basis and will concentrate on reinforcing design knowledge and graphic skills. To be successful students will need to be consistently industrious over the course of the year.
 

National 5 Practical Woodworking

The National 5 Practical Woodworking course provides a broad introduction to practical woodworking. It is largely workshop-based, combining elements of theory and practical woodworking techniques. 

Candidates develop practical psychomotor skills (manual dexterity and control) in a universally popular practical craft. They are introduced to safe working practices and become proactive in matters of health and safety. They learn how to use a range of tools, equipment and materials safely and correctly. 

Candidates develop skills in reading drawings and diagrams, measuring and marking out, cutting, shaping and finishing materials. They learn how to work effectively alongside others in a shared workshop environment. Course activities also provide opportunities to build self-confidence and to enhance skills in numeracy, thinking, planning, organising and communicating — these are all valuable skills for learning, for life and for work. 

The course encourages candidates to become responsible and creative in their use of technologies and to develop attributes such as flexibility, enthusiasm, perseverance, reliability and confidence. 

Purpose and aims 

The National 5 Practical Woodworking course provides opportunities for candidates to gain a range of theoretical and practical woodworking skills relating to tools, equipment, processes and materials. They also develop skills in reading and interpreting working drawings and related documents as well as an understanding of health and safety. 

The course is practical, exploratory and experiential in nature. It engages candidates with technologies, allowing them to consider the impact that practical technologies have on our environment and society. 

Through this, they develop skills, knowledge and understanding of: 

  • woodworking techniques 
  • measuring and marking out timber sections and sheet materials 
  • safe working practices in workshop environments 
  • practical creativity and problem-solving skills 
  • sustainability issues in a practical woodworking context 

Who is this course for? 

This course is a broad-based qualification, suitable for learners with an interest in practical technologies. It is largely learner-centred, includes practical and experiential learning opportunities and is suitable for those wanting to progress onto further levels of study or a related career.
 

National 5 Practical Metalworking

The National 5 Practical Metalworking course provides a broad introduction to practical metalworking. It is largely workshop-based, combining elements of theory and practical metalworking techniques. 

Candidates develop practical psychomotor skills (manual dexterity and control) in a universally popular practical craft. They are introduced to safe working practices and become proactive in matters of health and safety. They learn how to use a range of tools, equipment and materials safely and correctly. 

Candidates develop skills in reading drawings and diagrams, measuring and marking out, cutting, shaping and finishing materials. They learn how to work effectively alongside others in a shared workshop environment. Course activities also provide opportunities to build self-confidence and to enhance skills in numeracy, thinking, planning, organising and communicating — these are all valuable skills for learning, for life and for work. 

The course encourages candidates to become responsible and creative in their use of technologies and to develop attributes such as flexibility, enthusiasm, perseverance, reliability and confidence. 

Purpose and aims 

The National 5 Practical Metalworking course provides opportunities for candidates to gain a range of theoretical and practical metalworking skills relating to tools, equipment, processes and materials. They also develop skills in reading and interpreting working drawings and related documents as well as an understanding of health and safety. 

The course is practical, exploratory and experiential in nature. It engages candidates with technologies, allowing them to consider the impact that practical technologies have on our environment and society. 

Through this, they develop skills, knowledge and understanding of: 

  • metalworking techniques 
  • measuring and marking out metals 
  • safe working practices in workshop environments 
  • practical creativity and problem-solving skills 
  • sustainability issues in a practical metalworking context 

Who is this course for? 

This course is a broad-based qualification, suitable for learners with an interest in practical technologies. It is largely learner-centred, includes practical and experiential learning opportunities and is suitable for those wanting to progress onto further levels of study or a related career.


 

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