Our highly successful Faculty is committed to advancing the attainment of our youngsters through high quality and innovative teaching processes that create exciting learning opportunities for all.

In line with our whole school Vision of Excellence, the focus of the work of the Faculty of Science is the learning and development of youngsters in all courses and levels.

Our vision is one of:
  • Pupils who are capable, ethical citizens of the world, distinguished by their knowledge of Science, their engagement with the subject and their problem solving capabilities.
  • Teaching practice that is recognised within the school community for its originality and rigour; a Science Staff that inform and lead professional practice.
  • An Environment that challenges, enthuses and supports all to learn and excel
  • To strengthen and sustain our capacity to realise this vision our Staff will actively seek to expand upon their Professional Development, ensuring that every youngster in our care is afforded the best possible Science education.
Through learning in Biology, learners develop their interest in and understanding of the world. They will engage in a wide range of investigative tasks, which allows them to develop important skills to become creative, inventive and enterprising, in a world where the skills and knowledge developed by Biology are needed across all sectors of society. Learners develop skills of scientific inquiry, investigation and analytical thinking, along with knowledge and understanding of the world around them.

Our Courses encourage resourcefulness, which leads to becoming a confident individual. Successful learners in Biology think creatively, analyse and solve problems. Through studying Biology in St Andrew’s we produce responsible citizens, through studying the impact it makes on their lives, on the environment, and on society.
 

{slider title="Broad General Education: S1 - S3" class="icon"}

S1

In S1, a range of topics are covered including: Our DNA; This is Me; The Periodic Table; What’s the Matter; Hot Stuff; Energy & Forces

S2 Science

In S2, a range of topics are covered including: communication; relationships; Curiosity; Reflection.

S3 Biology

In S3, a range of topics are covered including: cell structure and transport; DNA; genetic engineering; stem cells; urinary system; cardiovascular system; environmental biology. Within BGE Science learners will develop transferable skills such as problem solving and teamwork when collaborating with others. In addition, the Science Faculty uses Making Thinking Visible thinking routines to help with the development of both academic and social skills.

Pupils will be able to:

  • Work cooperatively with others
  • Work independently
  • Develop social skills
  • Improve literacy and numeracy skills
  • Develop ICT skills
  • Develop skills of problem solving
  • Explore issues such as health and wellbeing
  • Develop scientific enquiry and investigative skills
  • Become scientifically literate
  • Learn interesting and relevant biological content
  • Use technology, equipment and materials safely in a practical scientific activity

{slider title="Senior Phase" class="icon"}

The national courses will continue to build on the skills which students have been developing throughout S1- S3.

National 4 Biology

Cell Biology

The key areas covered are: cell division and its role in growth and repair, DNA, genes and chromosomes, therapeutic use of cells, properties of enzymes and use in industries, properties of microorganisms and use in industries, photosynthesis — limiting factors, factors affecting respiration, and controversial biological procedures.

Multicellular Organisms

The key areas covered are: sexual and asexual reproduction and their importance for survival of species, propagating and growing plants, commercial use of plants, genetic information, growth and development of different organisms, and biological actions in response to internal and external changes to maintain stable body conditions.

Life on Earth

The key areas covered are how animal and plants species depend on each other, impact of population growth and natural hazards on biodiversity, nitrogen cycle, fertiliser design and environmental impact of fertilisers, adaptations for survival, and learned behaviour in response to stimuli linked to species survival.

Added Value Unit

In this Unit, learners will draw on and extend the skills they have learned from across the other Units, and demonstrate the breadth of knowledge and skills acquired, in unfamiliar contexts and/or integrated ways.

Skills, Knowledge and Understanding

  • demonstrating knowledge and understanding of biology by making statements, describing information and providing explanations
  • applying biology knowledge to familiar situations, interpreting information and solving problems
  • planning and safely carrying out experiments/practical investigations to illustrate effects
  • using information handling skills by selecting, presenting and processing information
  • making generalisations based on evidence/information · drawing valid conclusions and giving explanations supported by evidence
  • suggesting improvements to experiments/practical investigations
  • communicating findings/information

National 5 Biology

The course content includes the following areas of biology:

Cell Biology

The key areas covered are: cell structure; transport across cell membranes; DNA and the production of proteins; proteins; genetic engineering; respiration.

Multicellular Organisms

The key areas covered are: producing new cells; control and communication; reproduction; variation and inheritance; transport systems — plants; transport systems — animals; absorption of materials.

Life on Earth

The key areas covered are: ecosystems; distribution of organisms; photosynthesis; energy in ecosystems; food production; evolution of species.

Skills, Knowledge and Understanding

  • The following provides a broad overview of the subject skills, knowledge and understanding developed in the course:
  • demonstrating knowledge and understanding of biology by making statements, describing information, providing explanations and integrating knowledge
  • applying knowledge of biology to new situations, interpreting information and solving problems
  • planning, designing and safely carrying out experimental/fieldwork investigations to test given hypotheses or to illustrate particular effects
  • selecting information from a variety of sources · presenting information appropriately in a variety of forms
  • processing information (using calculations and units, where appropriate)
  • making predictions and generalisations based on evidence/information
  • drawing valid conclusions and giving explanations supported by evidence/justification
  • suggesting improvements to experimental/fieldwork investigations
  • communicating findings/information

Higher Human Biology

Human Cells

In this Unit, learners will develop knowledge and understanding through studying stem cells, differentiation in somatic and germline cells, and the research and therapeutic value of stem cells and cancer cells. The Unit covers the key areas of division and differentiation in human cells; structure and replication of DNA; gene expression; mutations; human genomics; metabolic pathways; cellular respiration; energy systems in muscle cells.

Physiology and Health

In this Unit, learners will develop knowledge and understanding by focusing on the key areas of the structure and function of reproductive organs and gametes and their role in fertilisation; hormonal control of reproduction; the biology of controlling fertility; ante and postnatal screening; the structure and function of arteries, capillaries and veins; the structure and function of the heart; pathology of cardio vascular disease (CVD); blood glucose levels and obesity linked to cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Neurobiology and Immunology

In this Unit, learners will develop knowledge and understanding through the key areas of divisions of the nervous system and parts of the brain; memory as storage, retention and retrieval of information; the cells of the nervous system and neurotransmitters at synapses; the key areas of non-specific defences; specific cellular defences; the transmission and control of infectious diseases; active immunisation and vaccination and the evasion of specific immune responses by pathogens.

Skills, Knowledge and Understanding 

  • demonstrating knowledge and understanding of human biology by making statements, describing information, providing explanations and integrating knowledge
  • applying human biology knowledge to new situations, analysing information and solving problems
  • planning and designing experiments/practical investigations to test given hypotheses or to illustrate particular effects
  • carrying out experiments/practical investigations safely and recording detailed observations and collecting data
  • selecting information from a variety of sources
  • presenting information appropriately in a variety of forms
  • processing information (using calculations and units, where appropriate)
  • making predictions and generalisations from evidence/information
  • drawing valid conclusions and giving explanations supported by evidence/justification
  • evaluating experiments/practical investigations and suggesting improvements
  • communicating findings/information effectively

Advanced Higher Biology

Cells and Proteins

In this Unit students cover the key areas of Laboratory techniques for biologists; Proteins: Membrane Proteins; Communicating and Signalling; Protein control of cell division.

Organisms and Evolution

In this Unit students cover the key areas of Field techniques for biologists; Evolution; Variation and sexual reproduction; Sex and behaviour; Parasitism

Investigative Biology

In this Unit students cover the key areas of Scientific principles and process; Experimentation; Reporting and critical evaluation of biological research.

Skills, Knowledge and Understanding

  • extending and applying knowledge of biology to new situations
  • interpreting and analysing information to solve complex problems
  • planning and designing biological experiments/investigations
  • using reference materials and including risk assessments to test a hypothesis or to illustrate particular effects
  • carrying out complex experiments in biology safely, recording systematic detailed observations and collecting data
  • selecting information from a variety of sources and presenting detailed information, appropriately, in a variety of forms
  • processing and analysing biological information/data (using calculations, significant figures and units, where appropriate)
  • making reasoned predictions and generalisations from a range of evidence/information
  • drawing valid conclusions and giving explanations supported by evidence/justification
  • critically evaluating experimental procedures by identifying sources of error and suggesting and implementing improvements
  • drawing on knowledge and understanding of biology to make accurate statements, describe complex information, provide detailed explanations and integrate knowledge
  • communicating biological findings/information fully and effectively
  • analysing and evaluating scientific publications and media reports

{slider title="Weblinks" class="icon"}

SQA National 4 Biology

SQA National 5 Biology

SQA Higher Human Biology

 

SQA Advanced Higher Biology

BBC Bitesize National 4 Biology

BBC Bitseize National 5 Biology

BBC Bitesize Higher Biology

SCHOLAR

Dynamic Learning

{slider title="Skills for Work" class="icon"}

The national courses will continue to build on the skills which students have been developing throughout S1- S3.

National 5 Laboratory Science

The course content includes the following areas of Laboratory Science:

Careers using Laboratory Science - Scotland

This unit introduces learners to the wide range of industries and services that use scientific knowledge and laboratory skills. They learn about the variety of ways in which science and laboratory skills are used in different industries and services and about the job roles that use these skills. Learners investigate a range of career opportunities in industries and services that use laboratory science. They investigate the skills, qualifications and experience required for a job role of personal interest in the field of laboratory science. Learners prepare for employment, further education or training through producing their own curriculum vitae (CV) for a specific job role in a laboratory science setting.

Working in a Laboratory

This unit provides learners with the opportunity to learn basic laboratory skills such as handling chemicals and preparing solutions, and calculate and present results of their practical work. To maintain health and safety while working in a laboratory environment, learners follow safety and security procedures, and carry out a risk assessment. There are opportunities for learners to develop numeracy and communication skills when they record and report on their practical work.

Practical Skills

This unit provides learners with the opportunity to develop the skills most commonly used in laboratories. Health and safety is integral to the unit. Learners learn how to: work safely with potentially hazardous materials, such as microorganisms; measure radioactivity; develop competence using laboratory equipment; perform a titration, chromatography and distillation

Practical Investigation

In this unit, learners work to produce a plan, including practical procedures, to investigate a scientific topic. They devise methods that include a practical procedure to test the aim. Learners are assessed on their ability to carry out the practical procedure competently and safely. Learners produce a scientific report with their individual analysis and evaluation.

Employability Skills

The following provides a broad overview of the employability skills and attitudes developed in the course:

  • generic skills and attitudes valued by employers
  • understanding of the workplace and the employee's responsibilities, for example timekeeping, appearance, and customer care
  • self-evaluation skills
  • positive attitude to learning
  • flexible approaches to solving problems
  • adaptability and positive attitude to change
  • confidence to set goals, reflect, and learn from experience
  • specific vocational skills and knowledge

Further Information

SQA Skills for Work: Laboratory Science National 5 (SCQF level 5)

National 5 Health Sector

The course content includes the following areas of Laboratory Science:

Working in the Health Sector - Scotland

This unit introduces learners to the range of provision and the services provided by the health sector in their local area. Learners will participate in an interview for a specific job role which will help to develop knowledge and understanding of the world of work. The unit also focuses on the employability skills and attitudes identified as being those most valued by employers in the health sector. Learners will be given the opportunity to reflect on and evaluate their own employability skills and record their progress throughout the unit.

Life Science Industry and the Health Sector

This unit is designed to introduce learners to the contribution of the life sciences industry in the diagnosis and treatment of illness. Learners will investigate the safety of pharmaceutical products made by the life sciences industry and the health and safety responsibilities of employers and employees in the life sciences industry. Learners will also undertake a risk assessment in relation to production, storage or use of products made by the life sciences industry.

Improving Health and Wellbeing

This unit is designed to introduce learners to the wide range of options available in the health sector that help tackle current health and lifestyle issues. It introduces learners to the health and safety risks to workers in the health sector and the importance of a healthy lifestyle. Also, through team working, learners will give advice in relation to the promotion of health.

Physiology of the Cardiovascular System

This unit will provide learners with an introduction to the structure and function of the cardiovascular system. Learners will apply this knowledge to investigate the effect of a specific disorder on the structure and function of the cardiovascular system. Learners will participate in a practical activity which will help to develop knowledge and skills in taking physiological measurements at different activity levels. Learners will also participate in a practical activity to demonstrate current first aid procedures to provide emergency life support.

Working in Non-Clinical Roles

This unit introduces learners to the range and diversity of careers in non-clinical roles in the health sector. Learners will undertake an investigation into the roles and responsibilities of non-clinical roles and the diversity of career opportunities available. Learners will also participate in a practical activity which will enable them to demonstrate customer care skills in a non-clinical role.

Employability Skills

The following provides a broad overview of the employability skills and attitudes developed in the course:

  • Understanding of the workplace and the employee's responsibilities, for example, timekeeping, appearance, customer care etc
  • Self-evaluation skills
  • Positive attitude to learning
  • Flexible approaches to solving problems
  • Adaptability and positive attitude to change
  • Confidence to set goals, reflect and learn from experience.

Further Information

Skills for Work: Health Sector National 5 (SCQF level 5)

{/sliders}